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Children’s books that were turned into movies – Book Selections – 03/16/12

Posted on: Friday, March 16th, 2012

Our blog this week discussed the movie “The Lorax”. Many children’s books have been turned into movies.  This week’s book selections are for both new and classic ones.  Before your kids views any of these movies have them read the book.  After the movie discuss what was the same and what was different and which they liked best.

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs by Judi Barrett for kids 4 and up.  “The tiny town of Chewandswallow was very much like any other tiny town except for its weather which came three times a day, at breakfast, lunch and dinner. But it never rained rain and it never snowed snow and it never blew just wind. It rained things like soup and juice. It snowed things like mashed potatoes. And sometimes the wind blew in storms of hamburgers. Life for the townspeople was delicious until the weather took a turn for the worse. The food got larger and larger and so did the portions. Chewandswallow was plagues by damaging floods and storms of huge food. The town was a mess and the pople feared for their lives. Something had to be done, and in a hurry.”  Review from Amazon.

The Adventures of Tintin (3 Volume set) by Herge for kids 8 and up.  “Hergé, one of the most famous Belgians in the world, was a comics writer and artist. The internationally successful Adventures of Tintin are his most well-known and beloved works. They have been translated into 38 different languages and have inspired such legends as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. He wrote and illustrated for “The Adventures of Tintin” until his death in 1983.”  Review from Amazon.  This book contains 3 Tintin stories.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney is for kids aged 8 and up.  “Grade 5–8—Greg Heffley has actually been on the scene for more than two years. Created by an online game developer, he has starred in a Web book of the same name on www.funbrain.com since May 2004. This print version is just as engaging. Kinney does a masterful job of making the mundane life of boys on the brink of adolescence hilarious. Greg is a conflicted soul: he wants to do the right thing, but the constant quest for status and girls seems to undermine his every effort. His attempts to prove his worthiness in the popularity race (he estimates he’s currently ranked 52nd or 53rd) are constantly foiled by well-meaning parents, a younger and older brother, and nerdy friends. While Greg is not the most principled protagonist, it is his very obliviousness to his faults that makes him such an appealing hero. Kinney’s background as a cartoonist is apparent in this hybrid book that falls somewhere between traditional prose and graphic novel. It offers some of the same adventures as the Web book, but there are enough new subplots to entertain Funbrain followers. This version is more pared down, and the pace moves quickly. The first of three installments, it is an excellent choice for reluctant readers, but more experienced readers will also find much to enjoy and relate to in one seventh grader’s view of the everyday trials and tribulations of middle school.—Kim Dare, Fairfax County Public Schools, VA  Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.” Review from Amazon.

Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is for kids aged 7 and up.  “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) is a novel written by English author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. It tells the story of a girl named Alice who falls down a rabbit hole into a fantasy world populated by peculiar and anthropomorphic creatures. The tale is filled with allusions to Dodgson’s friends. The tale plays with logic in ways that have given the story lasting popularity with adults as well as children. It is considered to be one of the most characteristic examples of the genre of literary nonsense, and its narrative course and structure have been enormously influential, mainly in the fantasy genre. The book is commonly referred to by the abbreviated title Alice in Wonderland, an alternative title popularized by the numerous stage, film and television adaptations of the story produced over the years.  (Wikipedia)”   Review from Amazon.

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